Mulligan’s

Mulligans, Dublin

Having a good Guinness or a delicious cider is part of every trip to Dublin, Ireland. Tourists typically get stuck in a pub in the crowded Temple bar area in the city centre. Pubs there are often overcrowded and charge a big surplus. If you rather want the traditional pub experience you should choose a classic neighbourhood pub a little bit afar from the centre of tourist attraction.

Continue reading “Mulligan’s”

Irish

Airport, Dublin

Official languages of Ireland are Irish and English. If you travel on the island you don’t need to learn Irish, everybody will be able to talk to you in English (but it is always nice to know some words!). Every now and then you will probably hear somebody speaking Irish and most signs a bilingual. I didn’t experience any real problems because of that – only when I wanted to go by DART to Howth I was surprised that the destination of the train was Binn Éadair and I needed to get the clue that this is just another name for the same location.

Continue reading “Irish”

Leo Burdock

Leo Burdocks, Dublin

You can’t get to Ireland (or the United Kingdom) without having some fish & chips. It’s unhealthy but good and it forms a solid base if you later want to have some drinks. The best-known location for fish & chips in Dublin, Ireland, is Leo Burdock – an eatery founded it in 1913. Its origins lie in the Christchurch area and it was opened by a couple from the working-class quarter the Liberties.

Continue reading “Leo Burdock”

Iarnród Éireann

Ceannt station, Galway

For two days I was travelling by bus through Ireland and Northern Ireland. And then on my way to Galway, Ireland, I decided that it was enough. Jammed into an uncomfortable bus I took my smartphone out of my pocket and booked a train ticket from Galway back to Dublin. Without registration on the website. With online payment. And with choosing a seat like in an aeroplane. One of the best decisions I made on this trip.

Continue reading “Iarnród Éireann”

O‘Connell’s

O'Connells bar, Galway

If you’re in Galway, Ireland a pint of Guinness in O’Connell’s bar at the Eyre square is a must. It is conveniently located in the city centre and pretty close to the railway station – it is even great for a farewell drink. It was opened in 1970 and apart from being a great pub it has also a beer garden in the backyard. The old decorations inside are great and create a cozy atmosphere.

Continue reading “O‘Connell’s”

Galway cathedral

Cathedral, Galway

The cathedral of Galway, Ireland officially is called Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and Saint Nicholas (or Ard-Eaglais Mhaighdean na Deastógála agus San Nioclás). A very long name for a beautiful house of prayer. The Roman-Catholic church was opened in 1965; it is a rather young church in old style. Or better said styles: Gothic, Byzantine and Romanesque styles can be observed.

Continue reading “Galway cathedral”

McDonagh‘s

McDonagh's, Galway

Guided bus tours in Ireland seem to follow a clear schema: first, visit some great sights on a tight schedule and then drop-off the people in a nice city and give them 90 minutes. And then the pure dilemma starts: you desperately need something to eat but you also want to see the city. In Galway, Ireland, there is a good option for a fast traditional meal: McDonagh’s – the fishy alternative to McDonald’s.

Continue reading “McDonagh‘s”

National museum

National museum of Archaeology, Dublin

If you like to learn something about the past you’ve got many good options in Dublin, Ireland. The capital city is rich of national museums which don’t charge an entrance fee and it’s worth to have a look into all of them. The National Museum of Ireland has an archaeological section in Kildare street where you also can learn about the influence of the Vikings. Many ancient treasures of all ages are on display.

Continue reading “National museum”